Tag Archives: Osaka

Osaka Castle Part 2

Back in June, I covered some of the grounds and parks surrounding Osaka Castle.  Today, I have pictures from inside the grounds and keep.  Osaka Castle is full of history, but can become quite crowded as well.  When I went it was in the midst of Golden Week, and the crowds meant a long line to enter the keep and almost no chance of seeing any of the displays.  Although the peak of the building offers great views of Osaka,

Osaka Castle Grounds

Japan has many castles, but Osaka’s is perhaps one of the most well-known and most visually stunning of them all. Nestled within the sprawling and modern city, Osaka Castle is part historical monument, park, and attraction all at once. It is well worth a visit if only to explore the beautiful grounds surrounding the exterior of the castle. The towering structure is encircled by more than a moat. Trees, walkways, and parks form an amazingly interesting border between ancient and

Osaka’s Shitenno-ji Buddhist Temple Part 2

If you happened to read the first part of my Shitenno-ji tour you may have felt a vague sense of disappointment, incompleteness, or even confusion.  Don’t worry, all is answered here as our little tour moves past the gates and into the ground of the oldest state sponsored Buddhist Temple in Japan (the buildings aren’t the oldest, since they’ve been rebuilt, but the ground is the same-ish).  According to the English Language pamphlet provided with my entry fee, “Shitennoji was founded in 593 by

Shitenno-ji Temple, Osaka

Shitenno-ji is located in Osaka, Japan. It is the first Buddhist temple to be built by the state, specifically under the direction of Prince Shotoku. The Prince had a significant hand in promoting Buddhism in Japan during the 6th Century. The architecture is similar to Nara’s Horyuji Temple with a main gate, lecture hall, five-story pagoda, golden hall, and other structures. Unlike Horyuji, which holds the world’s oldest wooden building, Shitenno-ji has been rebuilt several times. Still, the grounds are

Emperor Nintoku’s Kofun

One of the things I love about Japan is its rich history.  Unlike America, which  has only been around for a historical blip, Japan has been going for hundreds of years.  One of the interesting historical tid bits are the Kofun, the ancient tombs of the Kofun period (huh, wonder why they chose that name for the 3rd-7th century…). I dutifully took Japanese Civilization at the University of Arizona and we eventually covered the keyhole-shaped tombs. They were so interesting