Tag Archives: cooking

Rice in Japan

With rice being a staple of the Japanese diet for hundreds of years, to the point where it was the basis of currency in the Tokugawa era, there is a lot of importance and variety to rice in Japan. For much of Japan’s history rice was grown by peasants for the use of upper classes. Though they grew it, they lived on lesser grains and grasses and it became a food they might only eat on special occasions or festivals.

Cabbage and Tofu Chanpuru

Today marks the start of my fifth year in Japan, and since school is out and there won’t be a School Lunch post this week, I thought it only proper to revisit my very first blog post on More Things Japanese.  Back then I did a recipe for Goya Chanpuru.  Today, I bring you another, more common version of this Okinawan favorite. Ingredients Small block of Tofu cut into large cubes 1 small cabbage 1 carrot 1 onion 1 green

Katsu Don

Katsu don is now a classic lunch dish in Japan, that while not very traditional, has almost become a kind of Japanese soul food.  When Japanese people want a quick, hearty meal at a restaurant they’re likely to order curry, a noodle dish, or katsu don.  Katsu is a fried pork cutlet. Traditionally, most Japanese ate little or no meat, so the dish was developed after the Meiji era when Japan was opened to the wider world.  A don, however, just

Ovens

Just as stoves are different in Japan, compared to those in America, so too are ovens.  Many of the reasons are the same, but Japan’s history plays its role here too.  Japanese ovens are usually small electric affairs rather than built-in behemoths.  As with many Japanese appliances, ovens are packed with features.  Mine steams, microwaves, grills, and has several oven settings all in one compact box.  The size fits with the smaller kitchens and lack of space in some Japanese houses.